Cosmopolitan magazine Illustration by Jon Whitcomb October 1951 (via)

Traci Lords in Cry-Baby (1990)

Where is Regan? In here. With us.

Boris Karloff on set of The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

kittenmeats:

"At the End of the Rainbow" (1946)

Bluebell Girls chorus dancer checking her costume in the dressing room of the Stardust hotel & casino before a performance, Las Vegas, by Ralph Crane, 1959 (x)

And then what did he do? Did he train you? Did he rehearse you? Did he tell you exactly what to do, what to say? You were a very apt pupil too, weren’t you? You were a very apt pupil! Well, why did you pick on me? Why me?!

Oxford Paper Company Advertisement featuring a Rose Marie Reid Swimsuit c. 1959

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jthenr-comics-vault:

COMIC BOOK CLOSE UP

B L A C K  C A T
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #194 (July 1979)
Art by Keith Pollard (pencils), Frank Giacoia (inks) & Ben Sean (colors)

Jo Jordan photographed by Bernard of Hollywood c. late 1940s

Happy Birthday Bettie Page  (April 22, 1923 – December 11, 2008)
"I was never the girl next door."

Diana Ross and the Supremes sing “Come See About Me,” “Stop! In The Name Of Love,” “You Can’t Hurry Love,” “You Keep Me Hanging On" and "I Hear A Symphony" on the Ed Sullivan Show on December 4, 1966.

ancientart:

The Poulnabrone Dolmen, County Clare, Ireland. Classified as a portal tomb, this structure dates to the Neolithic period, radiocarbon dates place its use between 3,800 - 3,600 BCE.

During excavations the skeletal remains of up to 22 prehistoric individual were found, which included both adults and children, as well as one newborn. Extensive specialist analysis has been done on these remains, offering us a rare insight into the lives of these Neolithic people. 

[…] A variety of artefacts, presumably representing grave goods, were also recovered from the burial chamber. These included a polished stone axe, two stone beads, a decorated bone pendant, a fragment of a mushroom-headed bone pin, two quartz crystals, several sherds of coarse pottery, three chert arrowheads and three chert/flint scrapers.

The burial evidence from Poulnabrone has given us rare glimpse into the lives of our early ancestors. It appears that they endured a relatively tough existence, that involved hard physical labour, childhood illnesses, occasional violent attacks and early deaths. Although only a small section of the community were deemed worthy of burial in the tomb, there is little evidence for gender or age discrimination, with both male and female remains present as well as young and old. Prior to interment their bones appear to have been stored elsewhere and this may indicate that they were venerated as ancestor relics. Why certain individuals were chosen to be buried in the seemingly exalted location of a megalithic tomb, however, remains a mystery. 

-Irish Archaeology

Photo courtesy of & taken by Nicolas Raymond.