gravesandghouls:

Tintype Witches, 1875 (via)

ankh-uas-djed-nefer:

The Great Sphinx still partially covered - Egypt, 1860

arsvitaest:

Charles Baudelaire, Les fleurs du mal, Paris: Michel Lévy frères, 186869;
painted cuir-ciselé panel inset on upper cover based on frontispiece by Félicien
Rops for Les épaves.

theladybadass:

While travelling by rail through North Carolina and the Virginiasphotographer Hugh Mangum took beautiful portraits of a variety of people. 

These portraits were taken between the 1880s and early 1920s. The above photos are a very small sampling of his work. The full collection can be found at Duke Libraries Digital Collection

Annie Jones- The Esau Woman

Shortly after she was born in Virginia on July 14, 1865, the hirsute Annie Jones began her career in exhibition. Purportedly born with a chin covered in fine hair, Annie’s average parents were originally horrified by her appearance. It wasn’t long, however, before the monetary benefits of their prodigious daughter dawn on the Jones family and word of her unique appearance came to the attention of elite showman P. T. Barnum.

When she was little more than a year in age, Annie was brought to New York City to be featured in Barnum’s museum as ‘The Infant Esau’. The name ‘Esau’ was often applied to hirsute wonders and was in reference to the biblical grandson of Abraham, brother of Jacob. Esau’s name in Hebrew means ‘hairy’, and, according to Genesis 25:25, it is a reference to his hairiness at birth.

After an initial short but highly successful run, Barnum offered Annie’s mother a three year contract, allotting Annie a weekly salary of $150 a week. Mrs. Jones accepted the offer, which was exorbitant for the era, and took up permanent residence with her daughter in New York. However, within the first year of the contract, a family emergency called Mrs. Jones back to Virginia and she left Annie in the care of a Barnum appointed Nanny. During this time, Annie was kidnapped by a local phrenologist who attempted to exhibit Anne privately. Luckily Annie was soon located in upstate New York, the kidnapper dealt with and Annie was quickly back in the custody of Mrs. Jones – who forevermore stayed in close proximity to her daughter during her career.

Annie’s career spanned thirty-six years.

During her long career Jones traveled not only with Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth, but also worked numerous dime museums. Annie’s stage name changed to reflect her age during her career. She was known as the Esau Child and later the Esau Lady and visually not only did Annie sport a full and long beard, she also grew out the hair on her head to over six feet in length. Annie also expanded her talents as well, as she was not content to simply be stared at. She came to be known for her musical skills and gracious etiquette as much as her facial hair.

At sixteen, Jones married Richard Elliot – a professional sideshow bally talker. The marriage lasted fifteen years before the couple divorced. Jones then married another talker, William Donovan. Together, the newlyweds struck out on their own and toured Europe with Annie as an independent feature attraction and William as a vocal agent. Unfortunately the marriage was short as William died without warning. Annie, not knowing what else to do, quickly rejoined Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth.

In 1902, Annie fell ill and while visiting her mother in Brooklyn and on October 22 she passed away at age thirty-seven.

Annie Jones was the most celebrated Bearded Lady of her era.

(via)

gravesandghouls:

Victorian bat costume c. 1882

theladybadass:

Fashionable young woman, circa 1890

(via Missouri Digital Heritage)

gravesandghouls:

Victorian costumes c. 1880s

Gabriel Ferrier (1847-1914), “Moonlit Dreams” 

fuckyeahlalique:

Bats and butterflies pocket watch. Rene Lalique (1860-1945) Ca. 1899-1900. Gold, enamel, moonstone,

"Of gilt-finished jewelled lever movement, the openface pocketwatch of circular outline with blued-steel moon-style hands and applied black enamelled Arabic numerals, against the gold ground accented by blue and white enamelled fluttering butterflies, within a polished gold case, the reverse depicting numerous flying purplish blue enamelled bats, with scattered moonstone accents, further embellished by a sculpted gold serpent bow."

hideback:

L’enfer Cabaret, Boulevard de Clichy, Montmartre, Paris

Built circa 1890; demolished circa 1952.

Entertainment inside the “inferno of hell” included musicians dressed as devils and interior volcanos that spewed scented lava of molten gold. 

After the “cabaret artistique” was demolished, the site became a Monoprix retail store.

c0ssette:

(Detail) Ajax and Cassandra, Solomon Joseph Solomon,1886.

magictransistor:

Karl Friedrich Schinkel, scenic designs for Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute); The Hall of Stars in the Palace of the Queen of the Night [Königin der Nacht]; Entwurfzeichnung zum Bühnenbild, Berlin, c. 1816.

Pandora (detail) by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917)

oil on canvas, 1896