Showgirls photographed by Gordon Parks, New York, 1958 (via)

Bear Mountain Park, New York, 1950 by Leon Levinstein (via)

Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe photographed in New York by Sam Shaw, 1957

Bandit’s Roost, at 59½ Mulberry Street (Mulberry Bend), was the most crime-ridden, dangerous part of all New York City. Photo by Jacob Riis (1888) (via)

Of this address, and the infamous Mulberry Bend more generally, Riis wrote in his most famous book, How the Other Half Lives (1890):

Abuse is the normal condition of “the Bend,” murder its everyday crop, with the tenants not always the criminals. In this block between Bayard, Park, Mulberry, and Baxter Streets, “the Bend” proper, the late Tenement House Commission counted 155 deaths of children in a specimen year (1882). Their percentage of the total mortality in the block was 68.28, while for the whole city the proportion was only 46.20. The infant mortality in any city or place as compared with the whole number of deaths is justly considered a good barometer of its general sanitary condition. Here, in this tenement, No. 59 1/2, next to Bandits’ Roost, fourteen persons died that year, and eleven of them were children; in No. 61 eleven, and eight of them not yet five years old. According to the records in the Bureau of Vital Statistics only thirty-nine people lived in No. 59 1/2 in the year 1888, nine of them little children. There were five baby funerals in that house the same year. Out of the alley itself, No. 59, nine dead were carried in 1888, five in baby coffins. (source)

James Burke- New York, 1960

historyinprint:

Muhammad Ali & Malcolm X, New York, 1963.

David Gonzalez- Dancers, Mott Haven, August 1979, from the Faces in the Rubble series (via)

The photography of Stanley Kubrick c. 1940s-1950s (via)

Times Square, NYC, 1930

NYC color photography of Ruth Orkin c. 1950s (via)

NYC in 1963

missmonroes:

Marilyn Monroe in New York, 1956

A young woman fights the breeze in the observation tower of the Empire State Building, 1940s.

theconstantbuzz:

Aspiring actress Jean turns to drink to drown her sorrows after another unsuccessful day looking for work in New York. 1955

Anti-litter ad in the middle of Times Square, 1955 (via)