virtual-artifacts:

Double-headed Serpent, Aztec/Mixtec AD 1400-1521, Mexico. Copyright the Trustees of the British Museum.

Mosaic mask of Quetzalcoatl, 15th-16th century AD, From Mexico.

1956- Gordon Parks documented the everyday lives of an extended black family living in rural Alabama under Jim Crow segregation for Life magazine’s photo-essay “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” (via)

archaicwonder:

Neo-Assyrian Head of Pazuzu, Circa 8th-7th Century BC

Pazuzu was an Assyrian and Babylonian demonic god of the 1st millennium BC. He normally has a dog-like face like here, and where his body is depicted he has a scaly torso, a snake-headed penis, the talons of a bird and usually wings.

Although Pazuzu was a malevolent force, his image was used on amulets to ward off his enemy Lamashtu, a female demon that preyed on newborn babies and their mothers. The amulet was either worn by the mother or child and larger ones were placed above their bed on a wall.

His legend was adapted and used in The Exorcist films.

whitecolonialism:

Memphis 1968, Ferguson 2014.

We’ve never witnessed an American dream, we’ve only lived an American nightmare. - Malcolm X

centuriespast:

image



A Letter from Egyptian Queen to Hittite King

B.C. 1235 

Bronze

Museum of Anatolian Civilization

triglifos-y-metopas:

Throne of Tutankhamun

Tutankhamun’s tomb.

Valley of the Kings, Egypt.

18th dinasty (New Kingdom), 1332-1323 B.C.

ancientart:

The Maya archaeological site of Chicanná (‘House of the Snake’s Jaws’), Yucatán. Now largely buried in the jungle, the city of Chicanná peaked during the late Classic period, from about AD 550-700.

Photos courtesy of & taken by Luca Penati.

loverofbeauty:

Abu Simbel / Francis Frith. ca.1856-60. Library of Congress

todayinhistory:

August 6th 1945: Hiroshima bombed

On this day in 1945, the first nuclear attack in history occurred when the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The American plane Enola Gay dropped the bomb called ‘Little Boy’, which killed around 70,000 people instantly. The effects of the radiation killed thousands more in later years, resulting in a catastrophic death toll of around 140,000 people. Three days later the ‘Fat Man’ bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, resulting in the loss of around 75,000 lives; in both cases, the majority of casualties were civilian. Whilst other Axis powers including Nazi Germany had already surrendered earlier that year, ending the war in the European theatre, Japan had continued to fight the Allied forces. The bombings were therefore deemed necessary by the United States to end the war and avoid a costly invasion of Japan. In the aftermath of the devastating attacks, Japan surrendered to the Allies on 15th August, thus ending the war in the Pacific theatre of World War Two. Today, 69 years on, the atomic-bomb scarred cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki provide a sharp reminder of the horrors of nuclear warfare.

"My God, what have we done?"
- Enola Gay’s co-pilot Robert Lewis upon seeing the impact

manticoreimaginary:

The Library of Celsus

Built in honor of the Roman Senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus in Ephesus, Anatolia (now Selçuk, Turkey), the library was built to store 12,000 scrolls and to serve as a monumental tomb for Celsus. Celsus is buried in a sarcophagus beneath the library, in the main entrance.

Construction was between 117-120 AD, and the building is important as one of the few remaining examples of an ancient Roman-influenced library. It also shows that public libraries were built not only in Rome itself but throughout the Roman Empire.

The interior of the library and all its books were destroyed by fire in the devastating earthquake that struck the city in 262. Only the facade survived. 

todayinhistory:

August 3rd 1936: Jesse Owens wins 100 metre dash

On this day in 1936 at the Berlin Olympics, American athlete Jesse Owens won the 100 metre dash, defeating world record holder Ralph Metcalfe. Owens won four gold medals, in the 100 metres, 200 metres, long jump, and 4x100 metre relay, which made him the most successful athlete in the 1936 Games. Germany’s Nazi Chancellor Adolf Hitler had intended to use the Games to showcase Aryan supremacy, thus the success of African-American Owens was particularly poignant. His success made him a famous figure, but back home in America segregation was still in place. After a ticker-tape parade for him in New York, he had to ride a separate elevator to reach a reception in his honour. It was often said that Hitler snubbed Owens at the Games, refusing to shake his hand, but whilst the racist Hitler was certainly displeased by Owens’s success, these stories may have been exaggerated. In fact, Owens maintains that it was US President Franklin D. Roosevelt who snubbed him, neglecting to congratulate the athlete for his success. Jesse Owens died in 1980 aged 66.

"A lifetime of training for just ten seconds
- Jesse Owens

itscolossal:

888,246 Ceramic Poppies Flow Like Blood from the Tower of London to Commemorate Britain’s Involvement in WWI

ancientart:

Details from the Egyptian Tomb of Sennedjem in the necropolis of Deir el-Medina. Sennedjem lived in the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II during the 19th Dynasty.

Photos courtesy of & taken by kairoinfo4u.

"Gambler-Piegan" by Edward S. Curtis c. 1900 (via)

art-through-the-ages:

Death mask of Tutankhamen, from the innermost coffin in his tomb at Thebes, Egypt, Dynasty XVIII, ca. 1323 BCE.