The Prom Couple photographed by Henry Clay Anderson  c. 1960 (via)

1950s/1960s/1970s Vintage Christmas Cards: part two

source

African American men and women in service during WWll

Click here for more info and more images

Coca-Cola ad, 1967

unhistorical:

James Van Der Zee’s photographic chronicle of the Harlem Renaissance and African-American life in Harlem during the 1920s/30s (source)

In these photographs, you will not see the common images of black Americans — downtrodden rural or urban citizens. Instead, you will see a people of great pride and fascinating beauty.

vintageblack2:

Several cotillions featured in issues of Ebony during the 1960s.

digg:

Monday is the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Here are some photos from that day by Rowland Scherman.  

atribecalledgoodbreed:

Under the Boardwalk/Music Comes from Jukebox in a Beer Parlor

Leon Levinstein

Couple on a Paper Moon (via)

Antique Cabinet Photo (via)

sinidentidades:

A Look at Black Chicago in the 1970s

The Atlantic’s In Focus blog is doing a great photo series on America in the early 1970s. Last week they took a look at documentary photographer John H. White, who went on to win the Pulitzer Prize for Photojournalism in 1982. Here’s a quick look at the series, and you can see the whole thing over at The Atlantic.

Couple c. 1940s

Bruce Davidson’s “Time of Change: Civil Rights Photographs, 1961-1965

Singer Nat King Cole with his daughter Natalie Cole c.1956

collectivehistory:

The Story of Emmett Till

On August 24, 1955, Emmett Till and a group of teenagers entered Bryant’s Grocery and Meat Market to buy refreshments. What exactly transpired inside the grocery store that afternoon will never be known. Till purchased bubble gum, and some of the kids with him would later report that he either whistled at, flirted with, or touched the hand of the store’s white female clerk—and wife of the owner—Carolyn Bryant.

Four days later, at approximately 2:30 in the morning on August 28, 1955, Roy Bryant, Carolyn’s husband, and his half brother J.W. Milam kidnapped Till from Moses Wright’s home. They then beat the teenager brutally, dragged him to the bank of the Tallahatchie River, shot him in the head, tied him with barbed wire to a large metal fan and shoved his mutilated body into the water. Moses Wright reported Till’s disappearance to the local authorities, and three days later his corpse was pulled out of the river. Till’s face was mutilated beyond recognition, and Wright only managed to positively identify him by the ring on his finger, engraved with his father’s initials, L.T.

Till’s body was shipped to Chicago, where his mother opted to have an open-casket funeral with Till’s body on display for five days. Thousands of people came to the Roberts Temple Church of God to see the evidence of this brutal hate crime. Till’s mother said that, despite the enormous pain it caused her to see her son’s dead body on display, she opted for an open-casket funeral to “let the world see what has happened, because there is no way I could describe this. And I needed somebody to help me tell what it was like.”

In the weeks that passed between Till’s burial and the murder and kidnapping trial of Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam, two black publications, Jet magazine and the Chicago Defender, published graphic images of Till’s corpse. By the time the trial commenced on September 19, Emmett Till’s murder had become a source of outrage and indignation throughout much of the country. Because blacks and women were barred from serving jury duty, Bryant and Milam were tried before an all-white, all-male jury. In an act of extraordinary bravery, Moses Wright took the stand and identified Bryant and Milam as Till’s kidnappers and killers. At the time, it was almost unheard of for blacks to openly accuse whites in court, and by doing so Wright put his own life in grave danger.

Despite the overwhelming evidence of the defendants’ guilt and widespread pleas for justice from outside Mississippi, on September 23 the panel of white male jurors acquitted Bryant and Milam of all charges. Their deliberations lasted a mere 67 minutes. Only a few months later, in January 1956, Bryant and Milam admitted to committing the crime. Protected by double jeopardy laws, they told the whole story of how they kidnapped and killed Emmett Till to Look magazine for $4,000.

Coming only one year after the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education mandated the end of racial segregation in public schools, Till’s death provided an important catalyst for the American Civil Rights Movement. One hundred days after Emmett Till’s murder, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on an Alabama city bus, sparking the yearlong Montgomery bus boycott. Nine years later, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, outlawing many forms of racial discrimination and segregation, one year later it passed the Voting Rights Act outlawing discriminatory voting practices

Here you can read the confession in Look Magazine given by Bryant and Milam